Updating intel ssd

I'm happy to see that Intel understands how power loss protection can be a critical feature for the high-end client segment as well because especially professional users can't have the risk of losing any data.The SSD 750 is available in two form factors: a traditional half-height, half-length add-in card and 2.5" 15mm drive.I suspect Intel did this for heat reasons because PCIe is more capable of utilizing NAND to its full potential, which increases the heat output and obviously four dies inside one package generate more heat than a single die.With 18 packages on the front-side and 14 on the backside, the raw NAND capacity comes in at 1,376Gi B, resulting in effective over-provisioning of 18.8% with 1,200GB of usable capacity.The 2.5" form factor utilizes an SFF-8639 connector that is mostly used in the enterprise, but it's slowly making its way to the high-end client side as well (ASUS just announced TUF Sabertooth X99 two weeks ago at Ce Bit).The SFF-8639 is essentially SATA Express on steroids and offers four lanes of PCIe connectivity for up to 4GB/s of bandwidth with PCIe 3.0 (although in real world the maximum bandwidth is about 3.2GB/s due to PCIe inefficiency).I don't think it's an overstatement to say that Intel introduced us to the era of modern SSDs back in 2008 with the X25-M.

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the one that's covered by the heat sink and where the controller is) are quad-die with 64Gi B capacity (4x128Gbit), whereas the packages on the back-side of the PCB are all single-die.

The sequential write speeds may seem a bit low for such high capacities for that reason, but ultimately Intel's goal was to provide better real world performance rather than focus on maximum benchmark numbers, which has been Intel's strategy ever since the X25-M days.

At the time of launch, the SSD 750 will only be available in capacities of 400GB and 1.2TB.

An 800GB SKU is being considered, but I think Intel is still testing the waters with the SSD 750 and thus the initial lineup is limited to just two SKUs.

After all, the ultra high-end is a niche market and even in that space the SSD 750 is much more expensive that existing SATA drives, so a gradual roll out makes a lot of sense.

But when the time came to upgrade to SATA 6Gbps, Intel missed the train.

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