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Animations illustrate volcanic processes and how plate boundaries are related to volcanism. This magma seeps into crevices in existing rock to form intrusive igneous rocks.

The program also surveys the various types of eruptions, craters, cones and vents, lava domes, magma, and volcanic rock. Experts provide a graphic illustration of this process and explain the types and textures of rocks such as granite, obsidian, and quartz.

The program covers convergent boundaries, subduction, hotspots, and the debate over what drives plate motion. Mountain Building This program erodes the myth of the mountain as a solid, permanent structure.

This program traces the development of astronomical theory with discussions of the discoveries of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, and Newton.

The program also covers shoreline characteristics, currents, sea barriers, tides, and how the greenhouse effect could impact sea level and coastal lands. Living With Earth, Part I Scenes of San Francisco before the Loma Prieta earthquake introduce this program addressing how humans are learning to cope with earthquakes. Living With Earth, Part II Since the nineteenth century, humans have turned to the Earth for energy sources to fuel their industry.

Various groups and agencies are studying the San Andreas Fault and the damage caused along its path to better understand how earthquakes ravage the land. This program discusses where oil comes from, how it is extracted, and how it is converted into energy.

This program examines the traces left by early plants, animals, and single-celled organisms and follows the progression of life forms over time.

Connections are drawn between atmospheric gases, climate change, rock formation, biological functions, and mass extinctions. Minerals: The Materials of Earth Minerals have been indispensable to human civilization.

Images of an actual landslide illustrate the phenomenon. Sedimentary Rocks: The Key to Past Environments This program returns to the Grand Canyon: its exposed layers of sedimentary rock allow scientists to peer into the geologic past. Metamorphic Rocks The weight of a mountain creates enough pressure to recrystallize rock, thus creating metamorphic rocks.

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