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Simple physical damage to the muscle fibers causes them to release more of their fluids and therefore more stimulating substances for the tongue. Cooking intensifies the taste of meat and creates its aroma. It was salted, smoked, and even preserved in honey... Naturally there were serious problems in keeping the meat fresh, since mechanical refrigeration was unavailable. The texture of raw meat is a kindk of slick, resistant mushiness. The fluid release is at its maximum when the meat is only lightly cooked, or done 'rare.' As the temperature increases and the meat dries out, physical change gives way to chemical change, and to the development of armo as cell molecules break apart and recombine with each other to form new molecules that not only smell meaty, but also fruity and floral, nutty and grassy (esters, ketones, aldehydes)... Grilling, frying, and roasting are the usual fast methods.

The meat is chewy yet soft, so that chewing compresses it instead of cutting through it.

29-30) [16th-17th century France] "In 1560 Bruyerin avowed that he had 'more than once' seen '[half-cooked meats devoured so that blood almost flowed from the mouths of those who were eating.

Eleanor Scully & Terence Scully [University of Michigan Press: Ann Arbor] 1995 (p.

Medieval physicists--or physicians--told their contemporaries that cooking added either warmth and moisture or warmth and dryness to their foodstuff that was cooked: the cook chose his cooking method according to the inherent nature of the foodstuff and any need he had to correct this nature.

F j b, Poched egges are better than egges rosted hard or rere. 86-87) [Medieval France] "Modern physicists tell us that cooking changes the chemical characteristics of a substance.

Oxford English Dictionary RARE Etymology: Originally a variant of rear adj.1 As a result of the lowering influence of r on preceding vowels in southern varieties of English, rear remained homophonous with rare adj.1 at least as late as the 17th cent. This gave rise to the variant rare, which retained the early modern pronunciation in standard English (compare the current pronunciation of e.g. (3)...rawer meats are conduucive to vigor but in fact rather poor for the digestion.' Because bloody meat was thought to increase one's vitality and zest, eating half-raw meat became intertwined with the goal of arousing the body at table." ---Acquired Taste: The French Origins of Modern Cooking, T.

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